Queens Building Demolition

BAA Chairman Sir Nigel Rudd stands in front of the old Queens Building, now being flattened to make way for Heathrow’s new Terminal 2. (BAA)

BAA Chairman Sir Nigel Rudd stands in front of the old Queens Building, now being flattened to make way for Heathrow’s new Terminal 2. (BAA)

Demolition work of the famous Queens Building at London/Heathrow was initiated on September 29 by BAA Chairman Sir Nigel Rudd.  The project marks the beginning of the new £1 billion Terminal 2 project, which will be the new home for Star Alliance airlines from 2012.  The old T2 and the Queens Building have to go to make way for the new development and this will change the face of Heathrow forever.  The Queens Building was opened by Her Majesty the Queen in 1953 and was originally called the Eastern Apex Building.  It is best remembered by enthusiasts for its rooftop viewing area.
Sir Nigel Rudd said: “The Queens Building has long sat at the heart of Heathrow, but the past must make way for the future, as we prepare to construct a new home for the Star Alliance member airlines serving the airport.  We are proud to be rebuilding Heathrow and investing in what is undoubtedly one of the UK’s most important assets.  In a few years time, Heathrow will be largely new, and passengers and airlines will be using bright, modern and practical facilities which allow us to deliver higher standards of service.”
The new Terminal 2 will provide improved facilities and customer service, and will be one of the world’s most ‘sustainable’ airport buildings.  For the first time, all 25 Star Alliance carriers will be in one terminal, reducing the need for transfers across the airport and a number of features will improve Heathrow’s environmental performance.  Overall the Star Alliance member carriers offer 190 daily flights to 72 destinations in 41 countries from Heathrow.