Baggage Handling Round-up

A combination of bad weather and the ash cloud over Europe produced a rise in the number of missing bags, thought the overall trend is still down. (KEY Collection)

Tom Allett provides a round-up of recent industry announcements.

A combination of bad weather and the ash cloud over Europe produced a rise in the number of missing bags, thought the overall trend is still down. (KEY Collection)

On March 30 SITA released its seventh Annual Baggage Report.  The company says that despite an unprecedented 300,000 flight cancellations worldwide and a new record of 2.44 billion people travelling by air in 2010, the air transport industry has maintained the overall downward trend in baggage mishandling.  The report records that the rise in mishandled baggage claims last year was significantly less than the 10.41% rise in passenger volumes recorded.  It also shows a 4.4% rise in delayed baggage files last year despite three monthly ‘spikes’ ranging from 15% to 20% due to bad weather in February and December, and the volcanic ash cloud in April.
The year saw the first increase in baggage mishandling since 2007 when 42.4 million bags were delayed and the rate was 18.86 mishandled bags per 1,000 passengers.  In 2010, 29.4 million bags were delayed on arrival which translates into a mishandling rate of 12.07 bags per 1,000 passengers, which represents a significant decline in mishandling over the last four years.
The mishandling trend is downwards since 2007 thanks to improved technology and greater vigilance on the part of airports and airlines, many of whom are working together in the IATA Baggage Improvement Programme.
Logan Teleflex wins Casablanca Contract
ON APRIL 5, Logan Teleflex announced that it has won a €12.6 million (US$1.4m) contract to create a new baggage handling system (BHS) for Casablanca Mohammed V International Airport in Morocco.   The contract was awarded by the Moroccan Airports Authority and covers the design and build of a 100% hold BHS with in-line security screening and includes all engineering, manufacturing, installation and commissioning works.
Logan Teleflex has begun work on a new baggage system at Casablanca Mohammed V International Airport in Morocco. (Logan Teleflex)

The project engineering has begun and the BHS will go live when the refurbishment of Terminal 1 is completed in one to two years time.
Logan Teleflex will provide both automatic and manual sorting systems.
The automatic system comprises 72 check-in conveyors, giving a total conveyor belt length of about 2,100 ft (640m).  The system is equipped with four Level 1 and 2 automatic screening machines with a further two automatic machines for Level 3 and 4 screening.  Equipped with five automatic baggage label readers, 52 sorting chutes, and two automatic sorting carousels equipped with pushers, the system is designed to handle 4,800 bags an hour.
Logan Teleflex says the manual sorting system is: “an example of sustainable thinking” that uses 64 existing check-in conveyors.  The total length of these is about 1,115ft (340m).  The manual system’s security is provided by two automatic Level 1 and 2 screening machines plus a single Level 3 and 4 automatic screening machines.
Bernard Magny, Sales Director, Logan Teleflex France said: “We are pleased to win this contract for this exciting upgrade project and to bring our expertise and technology to the Kingdom of Morocco.  The investment in this advanced system will provide new efficiencies to Casablanca airport and will benefit its many passengers.  It is also long term solution that is capable of handling future growth in passenger numbers.”
 
Vanderlande for JFKIAT
VANDERLANDE INDUSTRIES has announced that it has been awarded a contract for the design and installation of a new airport baggage handling system at John F Kennedy International Air Airport’s Terminal (T4) in New York.
The new baggage handling system will manage outbound, inbound and transfer baggage for T4 and is designed to significantly contribute to the improvement of the travel experience at the airport.  In 2010, Delta Air Lines made the decision to consolidate their international flights on Terminal 4. The move is designed to reduce the number of passengers that will need to transfer to flights operating from other terminals, thereby making their journey easier and delivering a major improvement of the passengers’ experience when connecting flights at JFK.  At the same time, for some years, the new system will enable T4 to handle the steadily increasing number of people that that are predicted to travel by air.
Delta Air Lines will be the largest end-user of the T4 and the project is scheduled for completion in May 2013.
The President of Vanderlande Industries Inc, Mr Ewout Cassee, said:  “We are very proud to make a major contribution to the modernization of the Terminal 4 operations.  The new baggage handling system with a capacity of 6,500 bags per hour, will guarantee smooth baggage flows resulting in an improved passenger experience.”
The T4 operation will require 14,000 ft (4,200m) of new conveyors; the integration of ten automated screening machines as part of the new airport baggage handling system and will add six more high quality baggage carousels.  Vanderlande says it carried out similar projects at, amongst others, George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and Chicago O’Hare International Airport and has already implemented: “more than 50 system solutions in the USA and [that number] continues to grow every year”.