PTE Copenhagen

Kaba exhibited self-boarding and one-way corridor products at PTE. (Kaba)

Tom Allett visited the Passenger Terminal Expo 2011 event held in Copenhagen.

Kaba exhibited self-boarding and one-way corridor products at PTE. (Kaba)

The 17th annual Passenger Terminal Expo (PTE) was held at the Bella Centre, Copenhagen on March 29-31.  Over 150 international companies exhibited, bringing together the usual high-quality mix of industry players from around the world.  As usual, the event delivered a very good blend of the latest views and innovations.  Here are a just two of the items that caught the eye.

 
Access Control from AOptix
As the value and sensitivity of data, materials and infrastructure maintained in secure areas continues to increase, so too does the need for the conclusive authentication of individuals who have access to those areas.  For environments that require this level of authentication at access points, such as airports, AOptix is offering its InSight iris recognition access control system.  The company says is design is focused upon delivering choice to its customers.  Obviously, it complies with all the existing regulatory standards and provides a high degree of configurability, enabling its integration with a wide range of card readers and control panels without the need for additional hardware.  AOptix says that the functionality it provides allows for: “a breadth of single and dual factor biometric authentication options that work seamlessly within existing or new access control infrastructures.”
The InSight access control option offers standard Wiegand and RS-485 interconnects to and from card readers and control panels.  The system is also equipped with several other interfaces to aid in a robust access control system integration, including intrusion detection and power failure alarms, feedback signals, and miscellaneous outputs to accommodate any customer-specific integration requirements.
Depending on local security, throughput, and infrastructural requirements, the InSight system’s access control interfaces can be configured to support single or dual factor authentication, combining iris recognition biometric authentication with prox card or smart card token-based authentication.  The company points out that to accommodate varying card technologies and card reader positioning requirements, the card reader is not built into the InSight system itself, instead, any card reader with a Wiegand or RS-485 interface can be wired to the InSight system’s interface panel.
Cards and card readers are not required for strong authentication, nor are they required for a tie-in to a PACS architecture.  Whether or not there is card reader input, the InSight can be configured to output a Wiegand ID associated with the enrolled user.  In this way, the system may be configured to provide only biometric authentication, which is considered strong, single factor authentication; the access control panel then simply recognizes the InSight Wiegand output as if it had arrived from a card reader.
 
Template Storage: On InSight or On Smart Card
Building from the flexibility to integrate any Wiegand or RS-485 card reader, the InSight system also allows for the choice of on-board or on-card iris template storage.  When configured for on-board template storage and dual factor authentication, the InSight system can function in one of two ways.
• Preferentially, it looks up a template record using the ID number transmitted from the card, and then performs a 1-to-1 verification between the presented iris and that template record.
• Alternatively, the system can be configured so that the card ID number is not stored along with the template record.  In this case, the InSight system holds the presented card ID number in escrow while performing a 1-to-N biometric identification and the card number is sent to the control panel after a successful biometric identification.  While the latter approach does not conclusively bind the biometric and card records, it does enable stronger authentication for situations where the card record cannot be communicated to the InSight system during enrolment.
The InSight system can also be configured to integrate with systems where the biometric reference template is stored on a smart card. In this case, when a card is presented to the card reader, the reference template and card ID number are uploaded to the InSight system, which performs a 1-to-1 verification, and sends the card ID number to the access control panel if the verification is successful.
The very small template size (typically about 1 KB per iris) required for full performance iris matching is compatible with on-card storage for leading smart card formats such as iCLASS, MIFARE, and PIV II.
 
Operational Modes: On-Demand or Automatic Identification
To account for varying system administration needs, the InSight system offers two identification modes:
• On-Demand Identification Mode – In this mode, any single identification process on the InSight system must be initiated by a control server.  The server can be configured to repeatedly run the identification process, but it maintains full control of the InSight system.
• Automatic Identification Mode – In this mode, the InSight system is configured to continuously run identification processes, and send out the results from a given process in the form of a notification to a specified server.  In contrast to On-Demand mode, the InSight system controls communication with the server when in Automatic Identification mode.
AOptix says that the autonomous nature of Automatic Identification mode is well suited to either remote or local access control environments.  If the IP-based network or network connection fails, a system running in Automatic Identification will continue to function properly, sending messages to the access control panel whenever appropriate.
 
Kaba
German manufacturer Kaba presented its access control products: a self-boarding solution and a one-way corridor with extended recognition features.
Visitors had the opportunity to test and feel the self-boarding solution featuring an Argus HSB-M03 sensor barrier which provides a secure system for single-file access and Kaba’s Orthos PIL-M02 one-way corridor.
The self-boarding Argus HSB-M03 is already operational, leaving airport staff members’ hands free to carry out other important tasks.  The barrier has a sophisticated sensor system for secure single-file access, a fingerprint reader for secure self-boarding and a printer to deliver receipts.  The company says that its 2D barcode reader enables it to read several different types of media including paper tickets, home printed tickets and those produced with electronic media like smart phones.  Kaba’s Orthos PIL-M02 one-way corridor is also operational, securing airside areas at some European airports.  The company says that not only does it detect a pedestrian’s walking direction, but it is also equipped with a system for recognising objects that have been left behind.  The corridor has a modular design, allowing curved layouts to offer the so-called throw-through protection.