Recovery is an ARTS

Goldhofer reports that if its recovery system is not required for an extended period, only minor maintenance work is necessary and its modules can be stored “with convenience and ease”. (Goldhofer)

Frankfurt Rhine-Main has Goldhofer’s new ARTS-2 X A380 recovery system. Tom Allett reports.

Goldhofer reports that if its recovery system is not required for an extended period, only minor maintenance work is necessary and its modules can be stored “with convenience and ease”. (Goldhofer)

Every major airport in the world is vulnerable to its operations being disrupted by a disabled aircraft on the runway and the bigger the airframe, the bigger the potential problem.  Frankfurt is home to the majority of Lufthansa’s Airbus A380 fleet, and while the chances of having one of these huge airliners marooned on the airfield are small, every leading international gateway must ensure it has the right tools available to recover them if the need arises.  The cost of aircraft recovery can quickly run into millions, so having the necessary equipment is a comforting ‘insurance policy’.
Frankfurt Rhine-Main was the launch customer for the solution provided by Germany’s Goldhofer AG, based in Memmingen.  Goldhofer is best known for manufacturing a significant percentage of the world’s aircraft tow-tractors and specialises in the towbar-less (TLT) versions.  It has also provided aircraft recovery systems for many years and delivered more than 100 of them.  Its latest product is called the ARTS-2 X (Aircraft Recovery Transport System) and is the ‘big brother’ of its predecessors, designed to quickly remove damaged or defective aircraft up to the size of the Airbus A380 from airport taxiways.  It is the first such recovery vehicle specifically designed to cope with the giant double-decker airliner.
Goldhofer’s Chairman Stefan Fuchs, told Airports International: “Due to our extensive experience acquired during numerous successfully executed aircraft recovery operations since 1988, we know what the equipment is required to do in the event of an accident.  Over a period of three years, we have applied our know-how to the development of the new ARTS-2 X recovery system.”
Mr Fuchs described the ARTS-2 X as a “quantum leap”, adding that thanks to its recovery potential: “The concept constitutes a milestone in aircraft recovery for all aircraft.  The system caters for the complete palette of civil aircraft; even a damaged A380 with one or more defective landing gear sets no longer poses a particular problem to us.”