San Francisco Outlines Plans to Re-Open Runway 28L

Photo: Reuters / Jed Jacobsohn

Photo: Reuters / Jed Jacobsohn
Photo: Reuters / Jed Jacobsohn

Following the crash of Asiana Airlines flight OZ214 on the morning of July 6, 2013, San Francisco International Airport (IATA: SFO) has outlined plans to begin the removal of the Boeing 777’s airframe, make repairs to the infrastructure, and clean-up Runway 28L in preparation for re-opening once the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) releases the site to SFO.  The airport emphasises the clean-up process is complex and involves close coordination with Asiana Airlines, Star Alliance and flight code-sharing partner United Airlines and numerous other departments and agencies.
“The Airport’s primary goal at this point is to re-open Runway 28L as quickly as possible.” says John L. Martin, Airport Director.  “I want to thank all of our passengers and our airlines for their patience.  We will work around the clock to make all the necessary repairs.”
Before Runway 28L can re-open, the Airport needs to clear the area of debris, clean up spilled jet fuel and other hazardous materials, ensure all electrical systems are operational, repair all runway lights, and address damage to the sea wall.  At the same time, the FAA will make repairs to navigational aids and conduct test flights to re-certify the runway for operational use.
The NTSB has yet to release the area to SFO.  A firm re-opening date is expected to be set within the next few days.